Matt Manners
Written by
Matt Manners

Welcome to the Inspiring Workplaces Top 20 Articles on Workplace Culture for April 2023.

We want to help inform and inspire you from some of the best content out there. Each month we will consolidate these articles for you to help give you a quick and easy snapshot. To help drive you and your organisations forward.

The articles will be underpinned by seven key elements that are reflected in our bespoke COMPASS methodology, that also underpin the Top Inspiring Workplaces worldwide. They are:

  1. Wellbeing
  2. Culture & Purpose
  3. Leadership
  4. Inclusion
  5. Employee Experience
  6. Communication & Voice
  7. Society & Sustainability

The articles are as follows…

The Purpose Driven Work Culture
Source: Forbes
Authors: Teresa Hopke & Shannon Schuyler
IW COMPASS point: Culture

Creating a purpose-driven work culture begins with understanding what drives employees, whether it’s task-oriented goals or a focus on the organization’s larger mission.

PwC’s Chief Purpose & Inclusion Officer, Shannon Schuyler, suggests tapping into employees’ ethos and encouraging it in the workplace. By prioritizing purpose and values, leaders can create an environment that fosters engagement, ownership, and productivity. PwC assesses employees’ purpose to shape a personalized work experience and offer opportunities for purpose projects.

This approach increases creativity, innovation, and productivity, improving engagement and relationships between colleagues and teams, and driving business growth. Schuyler emphasizes the importance of creating a culture of belonging that supports employees’ individual purpose to drive business success.

Key takeaways

  • To create a purpose-driven work environment, it’s important to understand what drives people and tap into the ethos of feeling part of something bigger than themselves.
  • Prioritizing purpose creates a more meaningful environment for everyone involved, leading to increased confidence, stronger relationships, and improved productivity.
  • PwC uses a purpose assessment to personalize employee experience, align individual purpose with work, and offer purpose projects, sponsored by the organization, that align with employee purpose.
  • The connection between purpose and belonging, as well as humanizing the workplace, have resulted in increased creativity, innovation, and deeper client relationships, as well as stronger diversity, equity, and inclusion practices.
  • For candidates looking for a purpose-driven organization, it’s important to look for values that are baked into conversations, ask how meaning is created for work, and whether employees are able to bring what’s valuable to them to their employee experience.
  • To create a purpose-driven work culture, organizations should prioritize making employees feel like they belong and can live their purpose at work, allowing them to personalize their career and even supporting them if they need to go somewhere else to find that purpose.

Read the full article here

 

How to be a better leader in the new workplace
Source: Financial Times
Author: Dr.Grace Lordan
IW COMPASS point: Leadership

Dr. Grace Lordan, an associate professor at the London School of Economics and founding director of The Inclusion Initiative, suggests that companies should embrace the shift towards remote working as employees increasingly adopt a “remote-first” approach. Lordan’s research found that a focus on output over hours leads to increased engagement without compromising performance. She suggests that giving employees the freedom to work autonomously improves psychological safety from team members towards their manager, and will help organisations recruit, promote and retain more diverse pools of talented people. The research also recommends building a work culture where employees feel secure and have the freedom to bring their own perspectives, with a focus on reducing stress and illness in the sector.

Key takeaways 

  • Employees are driving the shift towards a reimagining of where, when, and how we work.
  • Some City staff are ignoring leaders’ orders to come into the office on a set number of days per week and instead adopting a “remote-first” approach.
  • Employers must prioritize psychological safety and build a work culture where employees feel secure and have the freedom to bring their own perspectives.
  • Fixed days in the office are already outdated, and functions and teams should define locally when they should be in the office to maximize productivity and satisfy operations.
  • A focus on output over hours will mean colleagues see the point of being in the office on the days they are asked versus working autonomously.
  • Giving flexibility increases trust and psychological safety from team members towards their manager.
  • Financial and professional companies that value productivity should choose a future of work that blends autonomous working and being on-site to maximize their organization’s productivity and operational needs.
  • Flexible working patterns benefit those with parenting and caring responsibilities, as well as those with disabilities, and can help companies recruit, promote, and retain a more diverse pool of talented people.

Read the full article here

 

What to do when a toxic work culture moves online
Source: Psychology Today
Author: Polly Campbell
IW Compass Point:  Culture & Wellbeing

Working remotely doesn’t always mean escaping negative workplace culture, as toxic behaviors can persist and affect employees’ mental health and productivity. A survey by ARRIS Composites showed that 69% of people have worked in such an environment, which can cause micro-managing, negative attitudes, harassment, bullying, gossip, and limited communication. To mitigate the effects, employees can set boundaries, avoid gossip, advocate for themselves, find coping strategies, and engage in hobbies to relieve stress. Employers should also address systemic failures and promote a healthy workplace culture.

Key takeaways

  • A negative work environment can persist even when working remotely.
  • A survey commissioned by ARRIS Composites found that 69% of people surveyed have worked in a workplace marked by negative behavior, and 20% say they are in one now.
  • A negative workplace can lead to mental health issues, lower productivity, innovation, high absenteeism, and burnout.
  • To mitigate the damaging effects of negativity in the workplace, set boundaries, avoid gossip, and advocate for yourself.
  • Find help and make a plan to deal with the negative behavior of co-workers or bosses.
  • If possible, leave the job if the work culture is too negative.
  • Set boundaries, turn off the work email after quitting time, and limit or eliminate one-on-one correspondence with the antagonist.
  • Reframe the practice as self-care, advocate for yourself, and avoid gossip.
  • Engage in hobbies outside of work to diffuse stress and restore.
  • Shift perspective by recognizing the negative behavior instead of taking it personally.

Read the full article here

 

Cultivating a positive work culture: The link between Employee Happiness and Productivity
Source: Corporate Wellness Magazine
Author: Editors
IW COMPASS Point: Culture

Fostering a positive work culture is crucial to the success of any organization as it increases employee productivity, improves retention, and overall performance. Employee engagement, reduced stress, improved teamwork, enhanced cognitive functioning, and increased retention are all connected to employee happiness. Strategies such as fostering open communication, recognizing and rewarding employee achievements, promoting work-life balance, investing in employee development, creating a culture of trust and respect, encouraging physical and mental health and peer-to-peer recognition, can be used to cultivate a positive work culture. Additionally, regularly assessing employee happiness is critical for identifying areas of improvement and implementing targeted strategies.

Key takeaways:

  • Fostering a positive work culture is crucial for the success of any organization, leading to increased productivity, improved employee retention, and enhanced overall performance.
  • Employee happiness has a direct link to productivity and is shown to improve engagement, reduce stress and burnout, enhance collaboration and teamwork, improve cognitive functioning, and increase employee retention.
  • Strategies for cultivating a positive work culture include fostering open communication, recognizing and rewarding employee achievements, promoting work-life balance, investing in employee development, creating a culture of trust and respect, encouraging physical health and wellness, supporting mental health and emotional well-being, encouraging peer-to-peer recognition, and measuring employee happiness and addressing concerns.
  • Becoming a Certified Corporate Wellness Specialist can provide individuals with the knowledge and tools necessary to implement effective wellness programs in their organization.

Read the full article here

 

Hustle culture: Is this the end of rise-and-grind?
Source: BBC Worklife
Author: Megan Carnegie
IW COMPASS Point: Culture

Hustle culture, which promotes the idea of constant work and striving for more, is losing its popularity as people re-evaluate their work-life balance during the pandemic. The culture stems from Silicon Valley’s intense work cultures, which became an aspirational business model. But hustle culture can have negative effects on workers’ mental and physical health, and some employees are pushing back, setting boundaries and prioritising personal lives and hobbies. Experts say economic uncertainty and greater awareness of inequality make the language of the rise-and-grind mentality feel outdated and out of touch. However, hustle culture hasn’t entirely faded, with some still subscribing to the approach.

Key takeaways

  • The article discusses the decline of hustle culture, which promotes the idea of constantly working and sacrificing personal life to achieve success.
  • Experts attribute the rise of hustle culture to the tech start-up boom in Silicon Valley and social media.
  • The pandemic has caused people to re-evaluate their priorities, and many are rejecting hustle culture in favor of work-life balance.
  • Some experts argue that hustle culture is not a meritocracy and can perpetuate inequality, particularly for women, minorities, and caregivers.
  • The article suggests that while hustle culture has not entirely disappeared, it is evolving as people prioritize health and personal life.

Read the full article here

 

Surgeon General: We Have Become a Lonely Nation. It’s Time to Fix That.
Source: NY Times
Author: Dr.Vivek H.Murthy
IW COMPASS Point: Wellbeing

US Surgeon General, Dr. Vivek Murthy, has proposed a national framework to tackle loneliness and social disconnection, which he describes as “one of our generation’s greatest challenges”. Around half of Americans experience measurable levels of loneliness, which is linked to anxiety, depression and health issues such as heart disease, dementia and stroke. The epidemic of loneliness also fuels other problems such as polarization and economic inequality. Dr. Murthy suggests structures to aid healthy relationships, renegotiating the relationship with technology and taking steps in personal lives to rebuild connections.

Key takeaways

  • Loneliness affects nearly everyone at some point and can have severe consequences for mental and physical health, including increased risk of anxiety, depression, heart disease, dementia, and stroke.
  • Social disconnection hurts communities and is associated with reduced productivity, worse performance in school, and diminished civic engagement.
  • Rebuilding social connections must be a top public health priority for the nation and requires supporting school-based programs, workplace design, and community programs that foster healthy relationships.
  • Individuals must renegotiate their relationship with technology, create space in their lives without devices, and take steps in their personal lives to rebuild connections with others.
  • Seeking help from supportive people, healthcare providers, or calling emergency services may be necessary for those struggling with distressing feelings related to loneliness.
  • Building more connected lives and communities can strengthen individual and collective well-being and help the nation respond to threats like climate change, gun violence, and economic inequality.

Read the full article here

 

‘Technostress’ | The impact of work tech on our mental wellbeing
Source: HR Grapevine
Author: Dr. Stephanie Moynihan
IW COMPASS Point: Wellbeing

Employees in the UK are increasingly experiencing technostress, as they become more reliant on digital devices and screens for work. This is leading to mental health concerns such as anxiety and depression, and is also affecting productivity and causing high absenteeism and turnover rates. Employers need to take steps to better support employee mental health and wellness, including facilitating access to mental health services and promoting a healthy work-life balance. Personal well-being should also be promoted, through initiatives such as employer-paid wellness programs.

Key takeaways

  • UK employees are increasingly experiencing technostress due to their reliance on digital devices and screens for work, which is causing mental health concerns, burnout, and affecting productivity.
  • HR leaders and businesses need to take steps to support employee mental health and wellness, such as facilitating access to mental health services and promoting a healthy work-life balance.
  • Employers should encourage employees to take regular breaks from technology and provide training programs to help manage time and stress levels.
  • Personal well-being should be promoted both in and outside the workplace, and initiatives such as employer-paid wellness programs can help.
  • There is a stigma around mental health issues in the workplace, and UK employers need to create a workplace free of stigma and promote conversations around the negative impacts of technostress.
  • Technostress is a growing concern in the UK workplace, and employers must acknowledge and address its negative impact on employee mental health to ensure a healthy and productive workforce.

Read the full article here

 

Does your workplace pretend to care about mental health? Here’s how to tackle ‘wellbeing washing’
Source: Metro
Author: Lizzie Thomson
IW COMPASS Point: Wellbeing

Many employers in the UK are guilty of ‘wellbeing washing’ by appearing to care about mental health without providing any tangible benefits or support to employees. This can take various forms, such as offering workplace wellness programs without giving employees the time to use them due to high workloads, or not providing adequate time off for mental health conditions. Wellbeing washing can be dangerous as it does not improve employee wellbeing and may cause employees to disengage, lose trust, and feel undervalued, resulting in lower productivity and higher staff sickness and turnover rates. Employees can address wellbeing washing at work by using a Wellness Action Plan to set out what affects their mental health and wellbeing in the workplace, how this may impact their work, what they need from their employer for better wellbeing, and what steps they can take to stay mentally healthy at work. If management ignores their needs, it may be time to look for a more supportive workplace.

Key takeaways

  • Many companies are guilty of “wellbeing washing”, appearing to care about mental health without providing tangible benefits.
  • Examples of wellbeing washing include hosting mental health seminars during lunch breaks or offering workplace wellness programs without providing time to use them.
  • Wellbeing washing can lead to burnout and long-term physical and mental health conditions.
  • Employees may feel undervalued and disengage from the company, leading to lower productivity and higher staff sickness and turnover rates.
  • To address wellbeing washing, employees can use a Wellness Action Plan to set out what they need from their employer for better wellbeing and any reasonable adjustments that could be made.
  • If management is not providing adequate support, employees may need to consider moving on to a more supportive company culture.

Read the full article here

 

Hybrid-Work Environments Are Becoming More Inclusive for Women: Deloitte
Source: Deloitte
Author: Emma Codd
IW COMPASS Point: Inclusion

The number of women who feel excluded from meetings and decision-making processes has decreased by 36% in the past year, as hybrid work environments become more inclusive, according to Deloitte’s Women at Work survey. While some areas, such as informal interaction, have seen improvement, 33% of women with hybrid schedules said there was still an “unsaid expectation” to be in the office, even if their bosses said they had flexibility, and the report recommended that leaders become more deliberate about inclusivity.

For all the important insights, access the full report here

 

The future of jobs is green: How climate change is changing labour markets
Source: World Economic Forum
Author: Suzanne Drake
IW COMPASS Point: Sustainability

Hiring for green jobs consistently outpaced overall hiring rates globally for four years, according to LinkedIn data in the World Economic Forum’s Future of Jobs report. Green roles, such as sustainability analysts, specialists and managers, featured in LinkedIn’s lists of the fastest growing jobs over the last four years. However, demand for green talent is outstripping supply, as only 13% of the labour force has green skills, which has risen by 40% since 2015. Policy-makers, business leaders and workers must boost green skills to drive change and meet ambitious targets set by governments and companies to reach net zero by 2050.

Key takeaways

  • LinkedIn data shows that hiring for green jobs has consistently outpaced overall hiring globally for the past four years.
  • Companies are facing pressure to accelerate their green transition, as sustainability is becoming a non-negotiable for many job seekers.
  • The World Economic Forum’s Future of Jobs Report 2023 maps the jobs and skills of the future, analyzing how macrotrends and technology adoption will shape the demand for jobs and skills.
  • While the green job revolution is broader than hiring sustainability managers, the supply of green skills is not keeping up with the demand for green talent, with only 13% of the labor force possessing the skills that organizations need and want.
  • The manufacturing, oil and gas, and mining sectors are leading the way in adopting more green skills, but more sectors and countries need to up their game by greening their businesses and upskilling their employees.
  • Companies that invest in upskilling their workforce and adapting their businesses to be greener will have a competitive edge when hiring the best talent.

Read full article here

 

Having Managers Who Don’t Do Work Isn’t Sustainable
Source: Forbes
Author: Steve Taplin
IW COMPASS Point: Sustainability

The CEO of Sonatafy Technology, Steve Taplin, argues that managers who only supervise people and do not contribute work should have no place in companies. He cites the examples of Meta, Amazon, and Twitter, who are eliminating such roles in favour of improving efficiency and decision-making processes. The Great Resignation has shown that remote and hybrid working setups have improved employee productivity, and managers must adapt by focusing on employee engagement, adapting to remote work, embracing flexibility, investing in professional development, and communicating effectively with their teams.

Key takeaways

  • Some companies have managers who only supervise people and don’t do much work themselves.
  • The pandemic has exposed the need for comfortable remote working spaces and highlighted the importance of employee productivity.
  • The Great Resignation has challenged managers and leaders to retain employees and remain relevant in a rapidly changing work environment.
  • Meta, Amazon, and other tech companies are focusing on efficiency by downgrading staff who are not performing well.
  • Managers can retain their value by focusing on employee engagement, adapting to remote work, embracing flexibility, investing in professional development, and communicating effectively with their teams.
  • Getting rid of managers altogether may not guarantee optimal performance as their role is to manage things and lead people, and it is possible to achieve both.
  • Good leaders must ensure the company remains alive to serve its course, and if those in the hierarchy do not align, they must step away to create room for success.

Read the full article here

 

The next frontier of Employee Experience
Source: Forbes
Author: Nell Derrick Debevoise
IW COMPASS Point: Employee Experience

Companies need to focus on intentional corporate behaviors that benefit more than the bottom line. The impact that companies have on society and the environment, beyond their employees or customers, must be acknowledged. Employers should create forums of collaboration and dialogue that start with identifying the root issues and creating action around next steps, empower employees, and commit consistently. In a recent survey, ~50% of employees say they would consider resigning if the company’s values do not align with their own, even in these difficult economic times.

Key takeaways

  • Actions and decisions in the workplace have an impact on three dimensions: Me, We, and the World.
  • Culture-first leadership focuses on a more holistic approach to outcomes that benefit not only the company but also its customers, suppliers, employees, and other impacted parties.
  • Employees are looking for transparency, measurable positive impact, and actionable commitments to society at large.
  • Companies can focus toward the ‘World’ dimension by aiming for progress over perfection, leading with vulnerability, empowering employees, and committing consistently.
  • Failure to do so can be dire for employee retention, as a significant number of employees have resigned from a job because the company’s values did not align with their own.

Read the full article here

 

The New Era of Employee Experience
Source: HRO Today
Author: Tim Stahl
IW COMPASS Point: Employee Experience

The pandemic has accelerated a shift in the employee experience, prompting employers to understand key trends and developments that attract and retain top talent. Employers need to invest in the employee experience, offer work-life integration, combat burnout and reduce platform fatigue. In addition, employers should create a digital ecosystem that drives productivity, reduces friction, and promotes equitable and inclusive organisations. These new trends offer a great opportunity for companies to enhance their employee experience, improve productivity and reduce attrition.

Key takeaways

  • The work world is undergoing significant changes and entering a new era of employee experience, accelerated by the pandemic but with roots pre-dating it.
  • Top talent has been drawn away from traditional work by an abundance of opportunities from new startups to the gig economy, leading to a struggle for talent in companies.
  • Companies need to offer more than competitive salaries and benefits to attract and retain the best employees, they need to invest in the employee experience.
  • Work-life integration is replacing traditional work-life balance, where employees want the flexibility to adapt their work schedule to their personal life.
  • Employee burnout is the biggest threat to businesses in 2023 and companies can take steps to prevent it by identifying employees at risk and enabling workers to schedule quiet times.
  • A trend that should happen in 2023 is a rationalization of digital tools so that they all interoperate with one another to drive productivity and eliminate friction.
  • Employee resource groups (ERGs) promote equitable and inclusive organizations, helping employees feel connected to the company and its values.

Read the full article here

 

The Rise Of The Chief Workplace Experience Officer: A New Role For A Digital World
Source: Forbes
Author: Andrew Mawson
IW COMPASS Point: Employee Experience

The war for talent has prompted organizations to pay more attention to employee experience in a bid to retain existing talent and attract new recruits. This has led to a new industry for the design and consulting world focused on designing ‘workplace’ or ’employee’ experiences. The role of the Chief Workplace Experience Officer or the Chief Employee Experience Officer has emerged to lead and coordinate all the individuals and units involved in defining, designing, and delivering the workplace experience. This new role will require knowledge of all disciplines associated with workplace experience, interpersonal skills, and the presence to work at the board level.

Key takeaways

  • The competition for talent is intense, and organizations are paying more attention to the employee experience to retain their existing employees and attract new recruits.
  • The workplace experience includes every aspect of an employee’s interaction with an organization, starting from the recruitment process to departure.
  • Employers need to think like retailers and create an emotional bond between the brand and the employees to design and deliver the right workplace experiences.
  • The workplace experience should be designed to appeal to specific employee groups to gain a competitive edge.
  • A new role of the Chief Workplace Experience Officer or Chief Employee Experience Officer must emerge to lead and coordinate all the individuals and units involved in defining, designing, and delivering the workplace experience.
  • The ideal candidates for this role will need to have enough knowledge of all the disciplines associated with the workplace experience, the presence to work at the board level, and the interpersonal and influencing skills to coordinate the work between all the different parties associated with the experience.

Read full article here

 

Understand what digital employee experience really is
Source: HR Director
Author: Elise Carmichael
IW COMPASS Point: Employee Experience

As companies continue to rely on remote or hybrid workforces, a healthy and productive digital employee experience (DEX) is crucial for employee productivity and job satisfaction. Six tips to ensure a healthy and productive remote workforce include understanding what DEX really means, knowing the health of the enterprise IT environment, gathering and using the trove of anonymised data from IT endpoints, ensuring each employee has the right digital tools, streamlining the IT support process, and focusing on prevention rather than just a cure.

Key takeaways

  • Remote or hybrid workforces have become the norm, and flexible IT networks and security infrastructure are necessary to support these work-from-home setups.
  • Digital employee experience (DEX) is crucial for employee productivity, satisfaction, and overall well-being, especially for virtual workers who are 100% dependent on technology.
  • DEX is the sum of all the perceptions that employees have about working with the technology they use to complete their daily work and manage their relationship with their employer across the lifecycle of their employment.
  • IT visibility into endpoint devices such as desktops, mobile devices, or servers is crucial for improving digital experiences, and proactive monitoring and measuring endpoint performance is the best way to get data-backed analysis of how well employees can use their digital tools.
  • Right-sizing technology can make a significant impact on employee morale as well as productivity, and giving employees the correct resources and the exact type of devices and apps they need to do their particular jobs without disruption is crucial.
  • Streamlining the IT support process with real-time data, as well as auto-detection and remedial automations, can eliminate a lot of questioning and guesswork and greatly improve digital employee experience.
  • Proactive IT services and even a self-healing help desk can resolve issues before they even become problems, and using artificial intelligence for IT operations (AIOps) can greatly improve digital employee experience.

Read full article here

 

A True Leader Doesn’t Just Talk the Talk — They Walk the Walk. Here’s How to Lead from the Front.
Source: Entrepreneur
Author: Jason Miller
IW COMPASS Point: Leadership

Leadership is more than just knowing everything; it’s about inspiring others through example and action. In order to create an engaged and motivated team, leaders must lead from the front, be willing to get their hands dirty, admit mistakes, and take responsibility for their team’s outcomes. Leaders must also hold themselves accountable, model the behavior they expect from their team members, and create a culture of accountability and trust within their teams.

Key takeaways

  • A strong leader must lead by example, taking responsibility for their team’s outcomes, and admitting their mistakes.
  • Leading from the front means taking the initiative, setting the pace, and taking personal initiative by working alongside team members.
  • Leaders must embody the values and mission of their organization, lead by example, and practice what they preach.
  • A strong leader must be willing to hold themselves accountable and set up systems to ensure they meet their commitments and follow through on their promises.
  • Leaders should be proactive in creating a culture of accountability and trust within their teams.
  • Leadership is about inspiring others through example and action.

Read full article here

Improving your work-life balance can make you a more effective leader at work
Source: Phys Org
Author: Klodiana Lanaj
IW COMPASS Point: Leadership

Managers who disconnect from work outside of the office can be more effective leaders, according to a study by the University of Florida, the University of Arizona and Florida State University. The research revealed that less-experienced leaders were especially prone to becoming ineffective if they spent their time focusing on work at home. Managers who could disconnect from work felt more refreshed, were identified as effective leaders and helped their employees stay on target better than bosses who spent their off-hours worrying about work. The study suggests a better work-life balance is key to effective leadership in the office.

Key takeaways

  • Managers who disconnect from work at home are more effective leaders and help their employees stay on target better.
  • Less-experienced leaders are more prone to becoming ineffective if they focus on their jobs at home.
  • The key to effective leadership is a better work-life balance.
  • Leaders who leave work at work feel more refreshed the next day and are more energized to motivate and guide their teams.
  • Businesses should reduce after-hours emailing and on-call work to help leaders recharge at home.
  • The key is to find methods to decompress from work as much as possible.

Read the full article here

 

UTSA researcher, alumna explore the link between speaking up at work and sleep
Source: USTA Today
Author: Zahra Heydarifard & Dina V. Krasikova
IW COMPASS Point: Employee Voice

A new research study by UTSA researcher Zahra Heydarifard and professor Dina V. Krasikova shows how vocalising an opinion during the workday affects sleep quality at night and how sleep quality at night affects the expression of voice the next day. The research reveals that voice has implications for sleep health, and promotive voice can improve employees’ sleep quality. Conversely, prohibitive voice can result in increased insomnia at night. The study included 113 participants, and their paper was recently published in The Journal of Applied Psychology.

Read full article here

 

Communication Is Key to Genuine Employee Engagement
Source: Business Daily News
Author: Isaiah Atkins
IW COMPASS Point: Employee Voice

Effective workplace communication involves personal connections, sharing the big picture, and giving and accepting feedback. Genuine employee communication is a two-way street, and it fosters meaningful, authentic employee engagement, and solid working relationships that can strengthen an organization’s core. Improving communication within a business is a straightforward process that can enhance engagement, improve employee retention, and enhance the bottom line. Effective professional feedback can help team members understand areas where they can grow without feeling insulted. Communication is crucial for resolving workplace conflicts.

Key takeaways

  • Clear two-way communication can help employees better understand their responsibilities, avoid costly mistakes, and gain a sense of shared mission.
  • Genuine employee communication includes personal connections, sharing the big picture, and giving and accepting feedback.
  • Poor communication between management and employees can lead to tangible losses, costing U.S. businesses up to $1.2 trillion every year.
  • Accuracy, brevity, and openness are essential for effective communication.
  • Business leaders can improve communication with employees by engaging with them on a personal level, explaining the reasoning behind a task, setting clear expectations, prioritizing constructive feedback, and using digital communication tools.
  • Effective workplace communication can foster authentic employee engagement, improve retention, and enhance the bottom line.

Read full article here


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