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Date posted: 10th July 2023

10th July 2023

Top 20 articles on Workplace Culture in June

Top 20 articles on Workplace Culture in June

Welcome to the Inspiring Workplaces Top 20 Articles on Workplace Culture for June 2023.

We want to help inform and inspire you from some of the best content out there. Each month we will consolidate these articles for you to help give you a quick and easy snapshot. To help drive you and your organisations forward.

The articles will be underpinned by seven key elements that are reflected in our bespoke COMPASS methodology, that also underpin the Top Inspiring Workplaces worldwide. They are:

  1. Wellbeing
  2. Culture & Purpose
  3. Leadership
  4. Inclusion
  5. Employee Experience
  6. Communication & Voice
  7. Society & Sustainability

The articles are as follows…

5 ways to forge a formidable CHRO/CIO partnership
Source: The HR Director
Author: Nathan Miller
IW COMPASS point: Leadership

A strong partnership between IT and HR leaders is critical for business success in the digital age. Technology and workplace culture are transforming organizations, and both departments need to collaborate closely. Five tips are provided to enhance the CIO/CHRO partnership, including choosing the right partner, engaging in strategy, developing a dynamic IT team, improving internal relations, and aligning technology with HR policies.

Key takeaways

  • CIOs and CHROs are viewed as strategic contributors, and their remits are blurring.
  • Every company is now a technology company, necessitating a technically savvy HR leader.
  • Technology is changing workplace culture and impacting job roles.
  • Collaboration between IT and HR is required to address skills shortages and navigate challenges.
  • Tips for enhancing the CIO/CHRO partnership: choose the right partner, engage in strategy, develop a dynamic IT team, improve internal relations, align technology with HR policies.

Read the full article here

 

5 Marks Of A Toxic Work Culture—And How You Know It’s Time To Leave
Source: Forbes
Author: Mark C. Perna
IW COMPASS point: Culture & Purpose

Toxic work cultures can be identified by traits such as disrespect, non-inclusiveness, unethical behavior, cutthroat competition, and abuse. These behaviors often stem from leadership, including poor communication, lack of accountability, and favoritism. Holding toxic leaders accountable can involve documenting instances of toxic behavior and addressing concerns with managers or escalating to HR. If an employee realizes they are contributing to a toxic culture, developing soft skills like emotional intelligence and communication can help. If the toxicity becomes unbearable, affects work-life balance, or hinders career progression, it may be time to seek a healthier work environment. Trusting instincts, researching turnover rates and reviews, and paying attention to the hiring process can help avoid moving to another unhealthy workplace. Creating a healthy work environment requires genuine care for employees’ well-being and treating them with respect.

Key takeaways: 

  • A toxic work culture is characterized by employees feeling undervalued, disrespected, and unsupported, leading to high levels of stress, poor communication, and lack of trust.
  • The MIT Sloan Toxic Five framework identifies five traits of a toxic work culture: disrespect, non-inclusiveness, unethical behavior, cutthroat competition, and abuse.
  • Toxic behaviors often stem from leadership, such as expecting long hours without additional pay, poor communication, lack of accountability, favoritism, and unfair treatment.
  • Holding toxic leaders accountable can involve documenting instances of toxic behavior, discussing concerns with managers, escalating to HR or higher-level management, and utilizing anonymous reporting channels.
  • Employees should also self-evaluate to ensure they are not contributing to a toxic culture and can develop soft skills like emotional intelligence, communication, active listening, delegation, and empowerment.
  • When the toxicity becomes unbearable or impacts well-being and career progression, it may be time to consider leaving for a healthier work environment.
  • Candidates can spot possible red flags by looking for high turnover rates, negative reviews on platforms like Glassdoor, and assessing the transparency and professionalism of the hiring process.
  • Creating a healthy work environment requires caring for the well-being of employees, valuing and respecting them, and addressing toxic behaviors promptly.

Read the full article here

 

BSI shares new workplace standards for menstruation and menopause
Source: HR Grapevine
Author: Serena Haththotuwa
IW COMPASS point: Wellbeing

The British Standards Institute (BSI) has introduced new workplace standards for menstruation and menopause, aiming to address the needs of workers experiencing reproductive health-related symptoms. The standards provide practical suggestions and adjustments for employers, including training for managers, quiet spaces, flexible work options, and creating an educated and safe space for menstrual health. Research shows that menopause-related symptoms cause employees to leave work, and the BSI believes the new rules will help retain talented staff. The standards promote inclusivity and aim to accelerate equity by recognizing the challenges faced by workers with disruptions due to menstrual health.

Key takeaways: 

  • The British Standards Institute (BSI) has launched new workplace standards for menstruation and menopause.
  • The standards provide practical suggestions and workplace adjustments for employers to support workers facing reproductive health-related symptoms.
  • Recommendations include training for managers and HR leaders, quiet spaces, flexible work options, and creating an educated and safe space for menstrual health.
  • The new rules aim to help organizations retain talented staff and promote inclusivity in the workplace.
  • Recognizing the challenges faced by workers with disruptions due to menstrual health can lead to greater employee retention, happiness, and productivity.

Read the full article here

10 Ways To Support LGBTQ+ Colleagues During June’s Pride Month And Beyond
Source: Forbes
Author: Bryan Robinson, Ph.D.
IW COMPASS point: Inclusion

June was LGBTQ+ Pride month, and while progress has been made, there is still work to be done to achieve equality in the workplace. A poll reveals a disconnect between LGBTQ+ worker presence and coworkers’ awareness of their existence. To support LGBTQ+ colleagues, educate yourself, raise awareness, be sensitive, lead by example, speak out against offensive comments, update policies, display welcoming signs, advocate for anti-harassment measures, establish all-gender restrooms, and provide inclusive family leave policies and healthcare coverage.

Key takeaways: 

  • There is a disconnect between LGBTQ+ worker presence and coworkers’ knowledge of their existence in the workplace.
  • Educate yourself on the LGBTQ+ population to combat stereotypes and misconceptions.
  • Raise awareness of LGBTQ+ Pride Month and mention local and global activities.
  • Be sensitive and respectful to all gender orientations and identities, avoiding assumptions.
  • Lead by example and demonstrate support for inclusion and diversity.
  • Speak out against offensive comments, jokes, or homophobia in the workplace.
  • Ensure your employee handbook is inclusive and up to date with anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies.
  • Consider displaying welcoming signs that embrace diversity.
  • Advocate for anti-harassment policies at professional conferences.
  • Establish all-gender or gender-neutral restrooms and provide inclusive family leave policies and healthcare coverage.

Read the full article here

How important is psychological safety in the workplace?
Source: HR News
Author: Editorial Team
IW COMPASS point: Wellbeing

Creating a psychologically safe workplace is crucial for organizational success and employee well-being. Research shows that psychological safety is the most important factor for effective teams. Poor mental health costs UK businesses £56bn annually. Cultures with high belonging see increased productivity and reduced turnover. Employees need to model inclusive behaviors and address triggered threat responses for effective implementation. Creating a psychologically safe space yields substantial returns for corporations. Rethinkly’s virtual software helps foster psychological safety in the workplace.

Key takeaways: 

  • Psychological safety is crucial for the success of an organization and the well-being of employees.
  • Poor mental health costs UK firms £56bn annually, highlighting the importance of creating a psychologically safe working environment.
  • 35% of the British workforce say they are unable to fulfil any kind of public delivery – presentations, client meetings, etc. – without acute anxiety.
  • 11% have a toxic relationship with peers and managers at work.
  • 26% harbour all workplace tension and find confrontation too difficult.
  • 15% have taken time off work due to feeling so challenged in communication.
  • 28% say that the inability to communicate within the workplace has had the largest impact on productivity.
  • 23% of workers say that due to living with mental health issues, they feel that their productivity at work is 50% or less of what it could be.
  • Company cultures with a high sense of belonging experience increased productivity and reduced turnover.
  • Creating psychological safety requires leaders to model inclusive behaviors and address triggered threat responses.
  • Mishandled feedback, intimidation, and jeopardized status or autonomy can contribute to feelings of being threatened.
  • Investing in a psychologically safe space yields substantial returns for corporations.
  • Rethinkly’s virtual software allows employees to recreate uncomfortable scenarios and foster psychological safety in the workplace.

Read the full article here

 

“Down the Road is Coming Much Sooner Than You Think”—Stephanie Bell on the rise of AI and Civil Society’s Response
Source: The Art of Association
Authors: Daniel Stid, Stephanie Bell
IW COMPASS point: Society & Sustainability

In an interview with Stephanie Bell, a Senior Research Scientist at the Partnership on AI, the importance of civil society’s role in guiding the path of artificial intelligence (AI) is discussed. Bell emphasizes the need for AI to contribute to human flourishing and highlights the potential dangers of AI exacerbating inequality. She suggests that civil society groups can play a crucial role by increasing diverse participation in AI development, supporting critics, and creating community-driven AI solutions. The Partnership on AI aims to bring together diverse stakeholders to address AI’s ethical and responsible challenges and promote shared prosperity.

Key takeaways: 

  • The rise of artificial intelligence (AI) is accelerating the pace of living and raising questions about its impact on society.
  • Civil society, including associations and movements outside of government and corporations, should play a role in guiding AI’s path in positive directions.
  • AI has the potential to contribute to human flourishing but also poses risks, including exacerbating inequality and concentrating power in the hands of a few companies and individuals.
  • AI can have negative outcomes even without a malicious superintelligence, through careless indifference or exploitation by bad human actors.
  • Civil society groups can help mitigate potential harms and realize the promise of AI by increasing diverse participation in its development, identifying conflicts and resolving them, and broadening perspectives and viewpoints.
  • Community-based organizations can represent specific groups and articulate their concerns regarding AI’s impact on their livelihoods, creativity, and economic well-being.
  • Promising examples of civil society’s response to AI include efforts to address the problematic use of facial recognition and the involvement of diverse stakeholders in frameworks for responsible practices in synthetic media.
  • The Partnership on AI, a nonprofit organization, aims to bring together diverse stakeholders to address ethical and responsible AI issues and advance progress through collaboration and problem-solving.
  • Guidelines for AI and Shared Prosperity are being developed to assess job impacts, promote responsible practices, and suggest actions for labor organizations and policymakers.
  • Gaps in civil society’s response to AI include the lack of powerful AI labs from marginalized communities, the need for independent organizations to act as watchdogs, and the exploration of community-driven AI systems.
  • Funding for community groups engaged in AI and developing their own solutions is lacking, while funding for existential risk considerations is more prevalent.
  • Nonprofits working on democracy, climate change, poverty alleviation, and other issues should consider the potential impact of
  • AI on their areas of focus and get involved early to anticipate and address problems or leverage opportunities.
  • It is important to stay informed about AI trends and be proactive in engaging with companies to prevent harms before they occur.

Read the full article here

 

Why leaders should set work-life boundaries among teams
Source: People Management
Author: Bernard Marr
IW COMPASS point: Leadership

Leaders should prioritize work-life balance among their teams as it directly influences employee productivity and well-being. Creating a team culture that supports healthy boundaries and work-life balance leads to lower burnout rates, increased employee engagement, and higher productivity. Leaders can encourage work-life balance by modeling it themselves, offering flexibility and remote working options, providing support systems, promoting physical activity and stress reduction, and teaching effective time management skills. As future workplace trends emphasize the importance of work-life boundaries, leaders should embrace this shift and empower their teams for greater productivity and employee satisfaction.

Key takeaways: 

  • The rapid pace of the fourth industrial revolution has led to a decline in work-life balance, impacting employee well-being and productivity.
  • Many leaders are recognizing the benefits of creating a team culture that supports work-life balance and healthy boundaries.
  • Encouraging work-life balance leads to lower burnout rates, increased employee engagement, lower turnover, decreased sickness and absenteeism, and higher productivity.
  • Healthy boundaries in the workplace include managing workload without overworking, spending quality time with loved ones, maintaining separation between work and personal life, prioritizing self-care, and getting sufficient rest.
  • Leaders play a crucial role in creating a culture that supports work-life balance by modeling good practices, offering flexibility and remote work options, providing support systems, promoting physical activity and stress reduction, and teaching effective time management skills.
  • Work-life boundaries are becoming even more critical for future workplace success due to trends like diverse and virtual workplaces, shifting employee values, and higher expectations of flexibility.
  • Leaders should embrace these changes, build a culture that supports work-life boundaries, and empower team members for greater productivity and employee satisfaction.

Read the full article here 

 

How to design internal communications for remote teams
Source: PS News
Author: Kristopher Martinez
IW COMPASS point: Communication & Voice

In an article on designing internal communications for remote teams, Kristopher Martinez emphasizes the importance of strong internal communications for workplace success. He discusses the challenges of keeping distributed teams connected and engaged in remote work settings. Martinez highlights the power of a smart internal communications strategy in unlocking valuable insights, separating signal from noise, and connecting critical dots within the organization. He also explores the role of internal communications in building a sense of community and belonging. Martinez provides tips for optimizing remote team communications and events, such as being intentional, designing for the audience, and focusing on the organization’s specific needs. The article concludes by emphasizing the importance of reimagining internal communications in the remote work environment to enhance the employee experience and foster a sense of purpose.

Key takeaways: 

  • Strong internal communications are crucial for workplace success in both cultural and operational aspects.
  • Remote work presents challenges in keeping distributed teams connected and engaged.
  • Avoid a “lift and shift” approach to internal communications and consider the unique needs and situation of your organization.
  • A smart internal communications strategy can unlock valuable insights, separate signal from noise, and connect employees to the company’s mission and vision.
  • Design internal communications for virtual teams with intention and inclusivity, ensuring equal access and participation.
  • Building a sense of community and belonging is important for remote teams, and virtual organizations can foster social connections through innovative communication and event formats.
  • Optimize internal communications by being intentional, designing for the audience, and focusing on your company’s specific needs.
  • Reimagining internal communications is crucial in the remote work environment to elevate the employee experience and foster a sense of purpose.
  • The future of work includes remote work, and organizations should strive to create an engaging and informed workforce regardless of location.

Read the full article here

 

3 Tips for Adapting to the Post-Pandemic Culture Shock at Work
Source: Inc.
Author: Sarah Lynch
IW COMPASS point: Culture & Purpose

The book “Culture Shock” by Gallup provides data-backed recommendations for companies navigating the post-pandemic work environment. Leaders need to balance the benefits of in-person work with remote preferences, prioritize employee engagement, and ensure customer satisfaction. The authors suggest involving teams and managers in decision-making, establishing a schedule with “smart autonomy” that aligns with workers’ preferences, and implementing a once-a-week “coaching habit” to strengthen manager-employee connections. These strategies contribute to a successful transition into the new world of work.

Key takeaways:

  • The book “Culture Shock” from Gallup provides data-backed recommendations for companies navigating the post-pandemic work environment.
  • Leaders need to balance the pros of in-person work with worker preferences for remote options to find a sweet spot that suits their team.
  • Involving teams and managers in decision-making correlates with high employee engagement.
  • Leaders should develop a scheduling plan that prioritizes “smart autonomy” and communicate the “why” behind it.
  • Emphasize the importance of in-person days and provide flexibility for onsite workers.
  • Establish a once-a-week “coaching habit” for managers to have meaningful conversations with their employees, which leads to higher engagement.

Read the full article here

 

How to Create a More Introvert-Friendly Work Culture
Source: Psychology Today
Author: Allison Abrams, LCSW-R
IW COMPASS point: Employee Experience

The article discusses strategies to create a more introvert-friendly work culture. It highlights the benefits of introversion and how introverted individuals are often overlooked or misunderstood in society. The steps to foster a supportive environment include self-awareness, embracing silence, offering diverse opportunities to contribute, evaluating performance in different settings, discussing differences, and recognizing the unique strengths of introversion. Introverts can bring valuable insights and ideas, and their contributions should be valued in leadership and decision-making.

Key takeaways: 

  • Introversion and extroversion lie on a spectrum and each individual is unique.
  • Introverts often face challenges in environments that value loudness and verbal participation.
  • Steps to create an introvert-friendly work culture include self-awareness, getting comfortable with silence, offering diverse opportunities to contribute, evaluating performance in different settings, discussing differences, and understanding the unique strengths of introversion.
  • Introverted individuals have valuable insights and can be effective leaders when given the opportunity.
  • It is not always the loudest individuals who have the best ideas.

Read the full article here

 

Employers and employees are not on the same page on wellbeing priorities
Source: The HR Director
Author: Jo Elphick
IW COMPASS point: Wellbeing

A recent research study highlights discrepancies between employers and employees when it comes to prioritizing workplace wellbeing. While both groups recognized stress/anxiety as important, employees placed more emphasis on it than employers. Additionally, employees prioritized “depression” and “burnout,” while employers focused on “men’s health” and “women’s health.” Legal & General suggests that involving employees in the design of wellbeing programs is crucial to ensure their relevance and value. Notably, younger employees and line managers showed a stronger interest in prioritizing mental health support. Business leaders are being urged to make employee wellbeing a top priority, as it can generate economic value. Legal & General promotes a holistic approach to wellbeing, encompassing mental, physical, financial, and social aspects, and emphasizes the integration of wellbeing with work culture, practices, and employee support. Employers should align their wellbeing programs with business goals and consider employee perspectives and workforce data.

Key takeaways:

  • Research reveals disparities between employers and employees regarding wellbeing priorities.
  • Employees prioritize stress/anxiety, depression, and burnout, while employers focus on men’s and women’s health.
  • Legal & General suggests employers should involve employees in designing wellbeing programs for relevance and value.
  • Younger employees and line managers show greater interest in prioritizing mental health support.
  • Business in the Community highlights the economic value of improved employee wellbeing.
  • Legal & General promotes a holistic approach to wellbeing, considering mental, physical, financial, and social aspects.
  • An organizational-level approach to improving mental wellbeing is recommended for effectiveness.
  • Wellbeing programs should focus on fixing work culture and consider all aspects of wellbeing.
  • Disparities in wellbeing priorities risk growing if not addressed, and employers need to link wellbeing strategies to business goals.

Read the full article here

 

What Gen Z wants in the workplace
Source: The Washington Post
Author: Britt Peterson
IW COMPASS point: Employee Experience

Gen Z, the generation born between 1997 and 2012, is entering the workforce with a focus on meaningful work, autonomy, flexibility, work-life balance, and collaboration. They prioritize values such as diversity, equity, and inclusion and are not afraid to ask for what they need. Companies are adapting to their demands, offering remote work options, transparency, mentorship opportunities, and showcasing their commitment to diversity and sustainability. Gen Z’s influence is pushing for significant changes in the workplace and holding companies to a higher standard. Despite the challenges they have faced, Gen Z remains determined to make strides and fix the mistakes of previous generations.

Key takeaways: 

  • Gen Z, born between 1997 and 2012, is entering the workforce with a focus on meaningful work, autonomy, flexibility, work-life balance, and collaboration.
  • They prioritize values such as diversity, equity, and inclusion and are not afraid to ask for what they need.
  • Companies are adapting to their demands, offering remote work options, transparency, mentorship opportunities, and showcasing their commitment to diversity and sustainability.
  • Gen Z is more diverse, tolerant, educated, and socially committed than previous generations, but they also report higher levels of stress, mental illness, and poverty.
  • Gen Z’s experiences with political and economic upheavals have led to a sense of betrayal and a desire for meaningful change.
  • They are actively working to improve the system, leading union drives and advocating for fair labor practices.
  • Gen Z seeks stability that contributes to the well-being of communities and the environment, prioritizing companies invested in environmental sustainability.
  • Mental safety is a major priority, as Gen Z reports higher rates of mental illness.
  • Workplaces are changing in response to Gen Z’s demands, with a focus on work-life balance, transparency, and opportunities for growth and development.
  • Gen Z’s digital tools and activism are reshaping the job application process and holding companies to higher standards.
  • Gen Z has more job opportunities than previous generations, and companies are competing to attract them.
  • They have split opinions on remote work, with some appreciating the flexibility and others longing for in-person interactions.
  • Companies are becoming more sensitive to the needs of remote and in-office workers and are making efforts to foster a sense of connection.
  • Recruiters are now expected to be direct about company values and initiatives related to diversity, equity, inclusion, and environmental sustainability.
  • Gen Z is pushing for impressive changes in the workplace and is unafraid to ask for what they need and want.

Read the full article here

 

Toxic work cultures start with incivility and mediocre leadership. What can you do about it?
Source: The Conversation
Author: Andrei Lux
IW COMPASS point: Leadership

Toxic work cultures are often rooted in incivility and mediocre leadership. Addressing this requires creating a positive work environment through respectful behavior, transparent communication, and leadership development. Encouraging feedback, promoting teamwork, and prioritizing mental and physical well-being are essential. Leaders must lead by example and demonstrate authentic leadership qualities. Individuals can respond to incivility calmly, seek support from colleagues, and escalate the issue to HR or relevant authorities if necessary. Breaking the cycle of incivility requires collective action and a commitment to fostering a healthier work culture.

Key takeaways: 

  • Incivility in the workplace is a common issue that can contribute to toxic work cultures.
  • Incivility is often triggered by feelings of being let down by leaders, excessive pressure, or retaliation.
  • Leadership behavior sets the tone for the entire organization, and incivility is particularly harmful when it comes from supervisors.
  • Authentic leadership, characterized by self-awareness, adherence to values, and consideration for others, can help reduce incivility and improve well-being.
  • Responding to incivility with more incivility is not recommended; instead, the BIFF technique (brief, informative, friendly, and firm) can be used to address the issue.
  • If the behavior persists, it’s important to approach a supervisor, involve supportive colleagues, and seek appropriate channels for redress, such as HR departments or unions.
  • Statutory agencies can intervene in workplace complaints, but seeking expert advice is advisable before pursuing formal processes.
  • Breaking the cycle of incivility requires individuals to speak up and take action.

Read the full article here

 

Employers failing on inclusion for disabled employees
Source: Personnel Today
Author: Ashleigh Webber
IW COMPASS point: Inclusion

Only one-third of disabled employees feel their employers are genuinely committed to inclusivity and removing disability-related barriers at work, according to a survey by the Business Disability Forum. The research found that disabled employees face delays in receiving reasonable adjustments, with some having to advocate for themselves or fund adjustments independently. The survey also revealed that many disabled employees still encounter disability-related challenges even after adjustments have been made. The Business Disability Forum recommended that employers simplify and improve access to adjustments, establish a single entry-point for support, and develop a comprehensive understanding of disabled employees’ experiences.

Key takeaways: 

  • Only one-third of disabled employees feel their employers are genuinely committed to inclusivity and removing disability-related barriers.
  • Disabled employees are waiting too long for reasonable adjustments, with some having to advocate or fund adjustments themselves.
  • The speed of getting adjustments has improved by only 4% since 2019, but one in eight disabled employees waits over a year for adjustments.
  • The Business Disability Forum recommends simplifying access to adjustments, establishing a single entry-point for support, and developing a comprehensive understanding of disabled employees’ experiences.
  • Managers need to have a greater understanding of disability and engage in conversations with employees about their needs.
  • Employers should ensure regular conversations and adjustments reviews, give more recognition to disabled employees, consider the use of ‘passports’, trust managers to implement flexibility, use inclusive terminology, and understand how to make effective occupational health referrals.

Read the full article here 

 

Job Satisfaction Is Rising: What’s Behind The Surprising Tend
Source: Forbes
Author: Tracy Brower, PhD
IW COMPASS point: Employee Experience

Job satisfaction is increasing and at its highest level in 36 years, suggesting reasons for optimism. Organizational culture, leadership, and work-life balance are key drivers of job satisfaction. Women experience less satisfaction than men, especially in areas like job security and promotion. Hybrid work arrangements have a significantly positive effect on job satisfaction. Companies should focus on creating a compelling vision, providing opportunities for participation, and offering flexibility and choice to improve job satisfaction.

Key takeaways: 

  • Job satisfaction is at its highest level in 36 years, almost 20 points higher than its lowest levels in 2010.
  • Job satisfaction predicts employee retention, customer loyalty, and financial outcomes for companies.
  • Organizational culture, leadership, and work-life balance are primary drivers of job satisfaction.
  • Women experience less job satisfaction than men, especially in areas like job security and promotion.
  • Hybrid work arrangements have a significantly positive effect on job satisfaction.
  • Companies should focus on creating a compelling culture, providing opportunities for participation, and offering flexibility and choice to improve job satisfaction over time.

Read the full article here

 

How to manage ADHD—and leverage its benefits—at work
Source: Quartz
Author: Taylor Elyse Morrison
IW COMPASS point: Wellbeing

The article discusses managing ADHD and leveraging its benefits in the workplace. The author shares personal experiences and provides six tips for better self-care and productivity, including using the “Catch, Check, Change” model for thought work, being flexible in goal achievement, creating visual cues for reminders, embracing a flexible structure with rituals, and seeking support and accountability from others. The advice applies to both neurodivergent and non-neurodivergent individuals.

Key takeaways:

  • ADHD individuals can be hypersensitive to perceived rejection and struggle with emotional regulation.
  • The “Catch, Check, Change” model can help ADHD individuals manage rejection and thought patterns.
  • It’s important to be stubborn about goals but flexible in the methods used to achieve them.
  • Visual cues and reminders can help ADHD individuals stay organized and focused.
  • Mainstream approaches to self-care may not work for neurodivergent individuals, so it’s important to define self-care based on personal needs.
  • Embracing a flexible structure and creating rituals that support daily needs can be beneficial for ADHD individuals.
  • Seeking support and accountability from others can enhance motivation and progress towards goals.

Read the full article here

 

Office workers feel a sustainable workplace is more important than an annual bonus
Source: Building Design
Author: Hollie Tye
IW COMPASS point: Society & Sustainability

Businesses need to take tangible action to create a sustainable workplace and move beyond empty promises and greenwashing. Focusing on the physical workplace and making small changes can have a significant impact, such as recycling and refurbishing office equipment, switching to energy-efficient lighting, and collaborating with renewable or carbon-neutral suppliers. While cost may be a concern, the long-term benefits in terms of staff retention and customer trust outweigh the initial investment. Business leaders should share advice, best practices, and results to drive real sustainability action and improve their impact on the planet.

Key takeaways: 

  • Businesses need to take real action, not just make empty promises, to create a sustainable workplace.
  • Companies are being held accountable for their environmental claims, and greenwashing is being challenged.
  • Cost is a concern for companies, but the long-term benefits of sustainability outweigh the initial investment.
  • Focusing on the physical workplace is crucial, especially with the shift to hybrid working. The office should be a place employees want to be without harming the planet.
  • Recycling and refurbishing office equipment can contribute to sustainability and reduce the carbon footprint.
  • Small changes, such as switching to energy-efficient lighting and collaborating with renewable suppliers, can have a significant impact.
  • More needs to be done to encourage organizations to make a real impact on sustainability, and business leaders should share advice and best practices.
  • Businesses are putting sustainability pledges in their plans and communicating commitments to staff and customers.
  • The office is an important asset for attracting and retaining employees, making it a starting point for becoming more sustainable.

Read the full article here

 

Breaking the burnout cycle: Tips for streamlining communication and boosting workplace productivity
Source: Ragan PR Daily
Author: Michael DesRochers
IW COMPASS point: Communication & Voice

In this article, Michael DesRochers discusses the issue of information overload and communication burnout in the workplace. He highlights the consequences of communication overload, such as stress and decreased productivity, and the unintended negative effects of tools meant to streamline communication. DesRochers provides practical strategies for addressing these challenges, including auditing and streamlining communication apps, consolidating workflows, making better use of existing tools like email, encouraging deep working time by minimizing notifications, using the right communication channels for specific situations, creating employee personas to tailor communications, giving more control to the communications department, and utilizing tools like PoliteMail to streamline communication and evaluate effectiveness.

Key takeaways: 

  • According to a recent report, a significant percentage of employees and managers feel overloaded by information, leading to burnout and decreased job satisfaction.
  • The rapid shift to remote work during the pandemic has resulted in employees being inundated with messages from various communication channels.
  • Strategies to combat communication overload include auditing and reducing the number of apps used, streamlining workflows, making better use of existing tools like email, encouraging deep working time by minimizing notifications, using the appropriate communication channels for different situations, creating employee personas to tailor communications, and giving more control to the communications department.
  • PoliteMail is suggested as a tool to streamline communication and evaluate its effectiveness, offering features such as engagement analytics and responsive email templates.

Read the full article here

 

A company replaced all of its managers with coaches. Employees became 20% more productive–and much happier
Source: Fortune
Author: Barnaby Lashbrooke
IW COMPASS point: Wellbeing

A company replaced its managers with coaches, resulting in a 20% increase in productivity and improved employee happiness. This approach focused on goal-setting, feedback, development opportunities, and autonomy, aligning with what employees needed. Coaches offered close mentoring, encouraged employees to identify their best working methods, and provided training and support. The shift led to higher engagement, lower turnover, and improved performance on key goals. Trust and support were found to have the greatest impact on employee engagement.

Key takeaways: 

  • Employee engagement has dropped to a seven-year low, with only a third of workers feeling engaged at work.
  • Disengaged employees are more likely to quit, and the main reasons for leaving are feeling undervalued, lacking a sense of belonging, and not being supported by managers.
  • Employers have experimented with surveillance software, but it breeds resentment and stress among employees.
  • The company Time Etc replaced managers with coaches based on what employees needed: goal-setting, feedback, personal and professional development opportunities, and autonomy.
  • Coaches mentor and support employees to help them be more productive and achieve their goals.
  • The company promotes a culture of self-improvement through learning opportunities and workshops.
  • Introducing coaches has led to higher engagement, reduced sick days, lower turnover, and up to a 20% improvement in performance on key goals.
  • While there were challenges in transitioning to a coach-led environment, the gains have been significant.
  • Employers who trust, invest in the development of, and support their employees are likely to see better returns in terms of engagement and productivity.

Read the full article here

 

Employee stress indicates layoff surviving workers are the real losers
Source: HR Grapevine
Author: Serena Haththotuwa
IW COMPASS point: Employee Experience

A recent study found that 76% of workers feel stress related to being at work, with economic pressures and the cost-of-living crisis cited as major causes. Surviving employees after layoffs often face increased workloads and report fears of taking on more responsibility. This increased workload, combined with difficulty discussing mental health, leads to burnout and decreased productivity. High levels of employee stress and mental health concerns contribute to increased sick leave and impact business performance. Laying off workers may save money initially but can lead to higher costs due to increased workload and employee stress.

Key takeaways: 

  • A recent study shows that 76% of workers feel stress related to their work, a 13% increase from the previous year.
  • Economic pressures and the cost-of-living crisis contribute to increased worker stress.
  • Surviving employees after layoffs often experience survivor guilt and fear increased workload and responsibility.
  • UK workers find it difficult to speak about mental health at work, hindering support for managing stress.
  • Increased workload and poor mental health contribute to higher rates of sick leave and impact business performance.
  • Layoffs may save money initially, but the increased workload and stress on remaining employees can have long-term costs for a business.

Read the full article here.

 

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